THE OPTIMISTIC CHILD PDF

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Martin E P Seligman. "The Optimistic Child" offers parents and teachers the tools developed in this study to teach children of all ages life skills that transform helplessness into mastery and bolster genuine self-esteem. Gillham, Reivich, Jaycox, and Seligman () created an. The epidemic of depression in America strikes 30% of all children. Now Martin E. P. Seligman, the best-selling author of Learned Optimism, and his colleagues . The optimistic child feels better about herself because she knows how to make things better. According to Martin Seligman,. Ph.d, author of The. Optimistic Child .


The Optimistic Child Pdf

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Program To Safeguard Children Against Depression And Build Lifelong Resilience By Martin E. Seligman pdf. The Optimistic Child: A Proven. Depression And Buildlifelong Re [PDF] [EPUB] download The Optimistic Child: A Proven Program to. Safeguard Children Against Depression and. The epidemic of depression in America strikes 30% of all children. Now Martin E. P. Seligman, the best-selling author of Learned Optimism, and.

I always put off doing my taxes. I was lazy about getting my taxes done year. I was a wreck that day. A game-show host picks you out of the audience to participate in the show.

I was sitting in the right seat. I looked the most enthusiastic. You are frequently asked to dance at a party. I am outgoing at parties. I was in perfect form that night. I don't put enough thought into things like that.

The Optimistic Child

I very much liked the author's step-by-step ways to challenge pessimism, so much so that I'll probably look into his other book Learned Optimism. But this book was specifically written for parents with exercises and stories that we're supposed to do with our kids.

He tested them out on a group of school kids as part of his research, and while I'm sure they were successful in Like all psychology books that appeal to me, this book cited real research, had a self-help angle, and wasn't dry reading. He tested them out on a group of school kids as part of his research, and while I'm sure they were successful in that venue, I didn't have much success trying to do them with my kids. He said they were made to be "fun," but my middle kid certainly didn't think so.

Oldest liked it a little better, but I read to him from the book only once. With all the other daily jobs of parenting, I just can't see doing these exercises in any sort of consistent way. I guess I'll have to write my own "optimistic" stories, tailor-made for my kids. Sep 16, Erika Hope Spencer rated it it was amazing.

This book is fascinating. Still, I absolutely believe that inborn tend This book is fascinating. Still, I absolutely believe that inborn tendencies can make it much much harder for some people to have this "glass half full" attitude and that doesn't even get into chemical imbalances and such.

Still for a non drug answer to giving your child ways to cope with life, this has been worth my free reading time. Resilience is key because life just sucks sometimes.

Perhaps it is unfair for me to apply the same criteria to this book as I would to something more scholarly, but Seligman's discussion of the increasing prevalence of depression among children was pretty unsatisfactory. He discounts the likely affect of the decreased stigma for acknowledging depression. He also ignores strong cross cultural research that indicates that societies with a high achievement focus and communal values also have high rates of depression and suicide among pre-teen and tee Perhaps it is unfair for me to apply the same criteria to this book as I would to something more scholarly, but Seligman's discussion of the increasing prevalence of depression among children was pretty unsatisfactory.

He also ignores strong cross cultural research that indicates that societies with a high achievement focus and communal values also have high rates of depression and suicide among pre-teen and teenaged kids.

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Most of the meat of this book could be reduced to a twenty page pamphlet. The rest of it feels filled with anecdotes about the progress of his research assistants. Seligman seems more concerned about the resumes and achievements of his staff than about actual practical information for parents.

Who is the target audience for this book?

Clinicians looking for case studies? Grad students? Professional colleagues? Any of these would be a better fit than readers looking for help with children with a Most of the meat of this book could be reduced to a twenty page pamphlet. Any of these would be a better fit than readers looking for help with children with a glass-half-empty outlook. May 21, Lisa rated it it was ok Shelves: I couldn't get through it.

It didn't seem like it was written to be a practical guide to raising happy kids, which is what I thought it was when I bought it. Feb 26, Mary Richardson rated it it was amazing. In , our oldest son was 9 with a prickly personality beginning to manifest itself. He always seemed so negative that I was worried about him being on the road to depression and problems with friends. I happened upon this book and I cannot tell you how it totally changed my perception of our son.

We were so worried about his ability to take direction, make good choices, think before he would act and as he seemed to just crash through life - instituting consequences would have him just digging In , our oldest son was 9 with a prickly personality beginning to manifest itself.

We were so worried about his ability to take direction, make good choices, think before he would act and as he seemed to just crash through life - instituting consequences would have him just digging in his heels. It seemed no matter what we did, he always had a workaround - chin out and arms folded. We worried that by escalating the punishment just to try to get some acknowledgement or feeling of remorse was not only a losing battle but damaging to him and his self esteem.

This didn't happen with his brothers and sister so he was feeling singled out.

Worried about depression in children, I bought this book and used the Resilience Assessment tool. He scored off the charts for resilience! What a I had to do. I stopped looking at him in terms of needing to be fixed and started appreciating his tenacity and ability to overcome adversity by getting going. This has proved true in his adult life, as well. Nothing gets him down for long.

He's still prickly about it but damned if he doesn't always work things through to an alternative that works for him when the original path does not. I have recommended this book ever since to any parent who is worried about their children and how they handle their emotions and life. As others have stated, it is very useful for adults, as well. I learned so much about each of my children and their ability to bounce back. Oct 11, AnaMaria Rivera rated it really liked it Shelves: Good book, not just for researchers but even more oriented to parents, based on decades of applied research.

The more of these, the more positive the atmosphere, and the more secure your child will be. The more secure he is, the more he will explore and find mastery.

But praise is an altogether different matter. Praise your child contingent on a success, not just to make him feel better. Wait until he fits the littl Good book, not just for researchers but even more oriented to parents, based on decades of applied research. Wait until he fits the little peg man into the car before applauding. Also, grade your praise to fit the accomplishment. Do not overpraise and treat the peg man achievement as if it were an amazing accomplishment.

Save your expressions of highest praise for more major accomplishments, like saying his sister's name for the first time and catching the wobbling football. To praise your child regardless of how well he does, to fail to grade your praise, is to render your child helpless. Aug 23, Patrick rated it it was amazing. I found this book very helpful in understanding what does on the mind of kids and how to give them positive reinforcement while also being honest.

Seligman's rich examples derived from other institutions across the world provide a great example of what we could be doing in the USA that we don't. I've tried to apply much of what I read to how I coach and raise my own kids and seen very positive results. It's been very helpful though at times difficult to implement. Overall, I really feel that I found this book very helpful in understanding what does on the mind of kids and how to give them positive reinforcement while also being honest.

Overall, I really feel that being honest and truthful with kids when they fail yet still providing encouragement is the best way forward as Seligman notes. We have to be honest and open with kids when they fail and why. I appreciate his work and dedication to extending his work around optimism to children and how to see more of this across schools in this country. Mar 20, John rated it really liked it.

I think Dr. Seligman would have preferred a different title - perhaps "How to immunize your child against depression", or "The Not-Pessimistic Child". He argues that optimists do better in life, so at some level it is easy to want your kid to be optimistic.

But by his definition of optimism and pessimism, both are inconsistent, treating good and bad experiences differently. That inconsistency can lead to depression if it is pessimism, but seems relatively harmless if it is optimism.

All that to s I think Dr. All that to say, despite having optimism in the title, the goal is to help pessimistic kids learn to challenge their pessimistic thoughts so they can become more even-handed and realistic in their appraisal of themselves and their circumstances.

There is a tension between honesty and optimism too. I initially thought he was advocating for that version of dishonesty, but he isn't. He can't quite get himself to stop using the word optimism, but his heart isn't in it. I agree with him. I'm going to try to help my kids challenge pessimistic thoughts and replace them with realistic assessments. The real question in my mind after reading this is - should I also help my optimist see the world more realistically?

Jul 21, Kelly Creel rated it it was amazing. This program does a great job giving practical solutions and exercises that allow both children and adults to practice assessing situations and making productive choices instead of following the path of cynicism and learned helplessness.

Sadly, optimism gets a bad rap, and the word itself has morphed into one that connotes unicorn rainbow farts and cotton candy clouds, but the author does a good job differentiating between optimism and realism, even explaining the minimal caveats of an optimistic outlook.

I found myself liking this a lot more than I expected. In particular I like how he debunks the Pollyanna mindset and explains why focusing on self-esteem can be so damaging. He then provides the standard cognitive behavioral therapy tools in a way that could be used for children.

The edition I listened to felt a bit dated so I'd be curious to hear an update on how well the interventions are working at preventing depression. Jan 02, Roxanne marked it as unfinished Shelves: I started this but then realized I needed to go read the adult version of Seligman's work first to really get the benefit.

In addition, my kid was a little young for many of the recommendations she was only five at the time when I was reading this in October I haven't yet come back to this, although now that my child is a little older maybe I can give it another try. Marking as "unfinished" until I actually pick it up again. Sep 23, Hilary rated it liked it Shelves: There is a lot of information in this book - difficult to take it all in in one reading. I will definitely have to revisit it again. The exercises are meant for year olds, so my child is too young to try this out on now.

However, I will be trying to work on some of it myself, so hopefully this modelling will help him pick up more optimistic habits assuming I can pick up the habits myself. Apr 29, Krista rated it really liked it Shelves: This was pretty awesome. It teaches parents how to teach kids healthy mental and emotional habits. This is something I hope to keep referencing for many years to come. Mar 05, Patrik rated it it was amazing. This is an excellent reference text for all parents.

The optimistic child

It provides concrete methods for equipping your children with the tools that will prevent them from ever being the victims of depression and anxiety. As a teacher I think the text will have dual uses as I can incorporate some of these ideas into my teaching.

Jul 14, Ryan Mclean rated it really liked it Shelves: A great book about teaching your kids competence and helping them take the right amount of responsibility in their lives. Teaches them to take control of what they can fix and accept the things they can't. Jul 22, Laura rated it really liked it. Really liked this one, 4. Many great ideas for how to safeguard children, and all of us, against depression.

Mar 21, Melanie Meyer rated it really liked it.

This book is intended for parents. Each strategy includes multiple examples and practice activities. Feb 24, Jose Romero rated it really liked it. This movement shifted its focus from talk therapy, which focuses on giving patients psychological air to discuss past trauma, to giving patients tools to overcome psychological obstacles. The Resilience Factor: Karen Reivich.

Freeing Your Child from Negative Thinking: The Hope Circuit: A Psychologist's Journey from Helplessness to Optimism.

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Product details Paperback: Mariner Books; Reprint edition September 17, Language: English ISBN Start reading The Optimistic Child on your site in under a minute. Don't have a site? Try the site edition and experience these great reading features: Mental Health. Book Series. Is this feature helpful? Thank you for your feedback. Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review.

Read reviews that mention cognitive therapy mental health highly recommend optimistic child year old self esteem recommend this book coping skills teaching our children great book every parent easy to understand explanatory style excellent condition childhood depression great tool scientific evidence older children learned optimism easy to read.

Top Reviews Most recent Top Reviews. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Paperback Verified download. Enjoyed this book immensely. It is some heavy but important reading in the beginning, e. Basically, I found it to be a "how to for countering the damage done by the previous few decades of false self esteem building" message. There has been a growing emphasis on building self esteem, but at the same time growing childhood depression rates.

It means developing a healthy, realistic, and resilient way of looking at the world and oneself. These are skills and attitudes that are developed by junior high school. Although perhaps more beneficial for parents of older children, I found that it did help change my behavior a little with my toddler. There are some nice example pages that give scripts of things you might say to your child from toddlers up through teens that I found particularly helpful.

I will reread it several times in the coming years, I am sure.

There is a depression screening tool for children included in one chapter. The book even helped provide some insight for myself into my own mental health. Breaking the negativity cycle is hard. My son is a bit too young for this now. But I have some concepts now of how to guide him out of the negativity that is so pervasive in my family. I have been working to lay a groundwork to break the cycle that I see developing in him as well. I have bought a few other books as well, mainly to work on myself.

I figured I would need to practice what I preach, and to provide a good example. Breaking the negativity cycle is hard, but this is a good first step, I think. Audible Audiobook Verified download.DPReview Digital Photography. Want to Read Currently Reading Read.

Jan 02, Roxanne marked it as unfinished Shelves: Sort order. Disputation for the above traffic example might sound like this: "I am overreacting. Failure is not catastrophic. It begins with the Ellis ABC model of adversity, belief, and consequence.

Failure and feeling bad are necessary building blocks for ultimate success and feeling good.